11 de julio de 2010

D. Hyder & H.-J. Rheinberger (eds.): "Science and the Life-World" (Recensión de R. McIntyre)

La página web Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews (10.07.2010) publica una recesión de R. McIntyre sobre el volumen colectivo, editado por D. Hyder y H.-J. Rheinberger, Science and the Life-World. Essays on Husserl's 'Crisis of European Sciences' (Stanford University Press, 2009).
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"In relation to Husserl's earlier work the Crisis includes a number of new themes, or themes newly emphasized and developed, that are important not only to phenomenologists but also to philosophers and historians of science. Perhaps the central notion in the Crisis -- and certainly the most famous -- is what Husserl calls the "Lebenswelt," the "life-world." The life-world is key to Husserl's account of what he sees as "the crisis" of the European sciences and its diagnosis. This account leads Husserl to articulate a conception of "Europe" defined by the ideal of rationality and the universality of knowledge, and of the history of European science and mathematics since the time of the ancient Greeks as a pursuit guided by this ideal. The pursuit would seem to have reached its goal with the advent of what Husserl calls "Galilean science," in which nature is described in terms of purely objective, mathematical laws. But Husserl sees this victory as Pyrrhic, for reasons I will discuss shortly. The Crisis also introduces a new emphasis on "historicity": Husserl explicitly recognizes science as an historical cultural product, and his analysis of its current state leads him to an unusual kind of search for the life-world "origins" of formal geometry and mathematical natural science -- a search that is partly "historical" and partly "ahistorical" or conceptual.

"These are the main themes addressed in the twelve essays the volume comprises. David Hyder's "Introduction", which gives a helpful overview of each of the essays and their relations to one another, groups the essays under three main headings: Husserl's theory of science and the notion of the life-world (essays by David Woodruff Smith, Dagfinn Føllesdal, Ulrich Majer, and Ian Hacking), the theory of history implicit in the Crisis (David Carr, Michael Friedman, Rodolphe Gasché, Eva-Marie Engelen, and Michael Hampe), and the dissemination and application of Husserl's theory of science in the Crisis (Hans-Jörg Rheinberger, David Hyder, and Friedrich Steinle). (...)

"Many of the essayists make illuminating, and sometimes surprising, connections between Husserl's ideas and those of others, including Carnap and Quine (Smith), Sellars (Hampe), Hilbert and Weyl (Majer), Fleck and Bachelard (Rheinberger), and Foucault and Cavaillès (Hyder). The volume thus has the virtue of presenting Husserl and the Crisis as very much alive and still in the game.

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Vid. La recensión de R. McIntyre de D. Hyder y H.-J. Rheinberger, Science and the Life-World.-
Vid. Índice del volumen.-
Vid. Introducción de D. Hyder a Science and the Life-World.-
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